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Saturday, October 29, 2011

Pinoy fast waking up to success

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The Philippines – with natural resources such as gold, copper, nickel and oil and gas aplenty – has tremendous potential. Last year, the republic registered an amazing 7.1% growth rate, and growing.

MALAYSIANS have looked down on the Philippines for decades, seeing the republic as South-East Asia’s basket case, a source of maids, manual workers and little else.

However, with Noynoy Aquino’s thumping electoral victory in last year’s presidential contest, international perceptions are starting to change.

At long last, the republic has a leader with an unquestionable mandate.

Indeed, the Philippines – especially for the businessman – is beginning to look very interesting.

On a personal note, and having experienced how Indonesia started turning around soon after Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono’s victory in 2004, Manila 2011 reminds me a great deal of how Jakarta was all those years ago: gradually reaching some measure of stability before booming.

Of course, recent natural disasters such as Typhoon Pedring have tended to focus our attention on the Philippines’ many weaknesses, much in the same way the 2004 tsunami shook Indonesia.

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Friday, October 28, 2011

Pinoys in Libya willing to take part in rehab work

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After weathering months of tension and uncertainty, Filipinos who stayed in Libya despite the armed conflict and destruction are willing to take part in the country's rebuilding efforts.

Regilito Laurel from Manila and Almahdi Alonto from Mindanao, who were among those who decided to stay during month of chaos and uncertainty, also foresee a need for Filipinos, especially teachers, nurses and engineers in Libya.

“Psychologically it will not be easy. So much of the city had been destroyed. Students will need therapy," Laurel, who along with Alonto is part of a group of 15 Filipino academicians at the University of Misrata, said in an interview with Arab News.

Alonto, who was brought up in Saudi Arabia where his family worked, is a lecturer in English literature, while Laurel is a professor of English at the university.

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Cancer diagnosis: 11 tips for coping

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Learning that you have cancer is a difficult experience. After your cancer diagnosis, you may feel anxious, afraid or overwhelmed and wonder how you can cope during the days ahead. Here are 11 suggestions for coping with a cancer diagnosis.

Get the facts about your cancer diagnosis
Try to obtain as much basic, useful information as possible about your cancer diagnosis. Consider bringing a family member or friend with you to your first few doctor appointments. Write down your questions and concerns beforehand and bring them with you. Consider asking:

What kind of cancer do I have?
Where is the cancer?
Has it spread?
Can my cancer be treated?
What is the chance that my cancer can be cured?
What other tests or procedures do I need?
What are my treatment options?
How will the treatment benefit me?
What can I expect during treatment?
What are the side effects of the treatment?
When should I call the doctor?
What can I do to prevent my cancer from recurring?
How likely are my children or other family members to get cancer?

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Thursday, October 27, 2011

Japan okays review of exams for Pinoy nurses

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TOKYO – The Japanese government has agreed to review the process of accepting Filipino nurses in its hospitals under the Japan-Philippines Economic Partnership Agreement (JPEPA), President Aquino said Tuesday night.

The President had a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda on Tuesday regarding people exchanges, including the Philippines’ request to look into the reason why only a few nurses passed the Japanese National Examination since the implementation of the JPEPA in 2008.

The Philippine government considers the examinations too stringent.

Noda recognized the Philippine government’s concern, Aquino told media over coffee at the Imperial hotel where he is billeted.

The Philippine government is aiming to have more professionals absorbed in the Japanese labor force.

The focus, for now, is on the entry of medical professionals such as nurses and caregivers into the Asian nation.

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Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Pinoy nurses seeking jobs in US declining

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MANILA, Philippines - The number of Filipino nurses seeking jobs in the United States dropped in the third quarter of the year, a lawmaker said yesterday.

LPGMA party-list Rep. Arnel Ty said only 1,370 Filipino nurses indicated their desire to seek employment in the US by taking the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX) held from July to September this year.

He said the number of NCLEX examinees was 38 percent, or 857, lower compared to the 2,227 Filipinos who took the US nursing licensure examination for the first time during the same period in 2010.

Citing statistics from the US National Council of State Boards of Nursing, the lawmaker said only 4,354 Filipino nurses took the NCLEX for the first time from January to September.

“This represents a decline of 44 percent, or 3,426, compared to the 7,780 Filipino nurses who took the NCLEX for the first time over the same nine-month period in 2010,” Ty said.

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IUDs for Birth Control May Cut Cervical Cancer Risk

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Sept. 12, 2011 -- Women who use intrauterine devices (IUDs) for birth control, even for a short time, have a lower cervical cancer risk than those with no history of IUD use, new research suggests.

Compared to women who had never used an IUD, the international study found that those who had used the implanted contraceptive had almost half the risk for developing cervical cancer, which is caused by infection with the sexually transmitted human papilloma virus (HPV).

IUD use is known to reduce endometrial cancer risk. But the impact of the birth control method on cervical cancer and HPV infection has not been clear, says study researcher Xavier Castellsague, PhD, of Catalonia, Spain's Institut Castala d'Oncologia.

The study is published online The Lancet Oncology.

"The good news for IUD users is that this form of birth control does not increase the risk of HPV infection and it appears to lower the risk for developing cervical cancer," he tells WebMD.

Castellsague and colleagues analyzed data from 10 previously published studies that compared women with cervical cancer to women without the disease and 16 HPV frequency surveys conducted in 14 countries.

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Thursday, October 20, 2011

HIV Used to Fight Cancer

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One deadly scourge may lead to cures for another.

A genetically modified form of the HIV virus was used by scientists at the University of Pennsylvania to re-program cancer patients' own immune systems to attack cancer cells.

BLOG: Phosphorescent Felines Fight AIDS
The treatment seems to have knocked out cancer in two patients and weakened it in a third. All three suffered from chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but researchers believe the technique could be adapted to take down other forms of cancer.

The technique was recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine. It works like this:

1. Doctors run the patients blood through a machine that removes T-cells, but returns the rest of the blood to the patient. T-cells are virus and cancer fighting white blood cells.

2. A modified form of the HIV virus is used to infect the T-cells and insert genes that cause it to recognize and attack a particular cancer, then multiply and survive in the patients for months.

The modified HIV virus carries what Carl June, one of the doctors involved, called a "Rube Goldberg-like solution," in an interview with the New York Times. The virus carries DNA from humans, mice and cows, a virus that infects woodchucks, and one that infects cows.

The modified T-cells then carry chimeric antigen receptors, proteins which allow them to recognize and kill multiple cancer cells.

3. Chemotherapy kills any remaining T-cells in the patient. The doctors don't want un-modified T-cells impeding the new ones.

4. The modified T-cells are returned to the patient. Within the patient the newly re-programmed T-cells proliferate.

"The patient becomes a bioreactor," said June.

5. Over the next few weeks the patient develops a temperature, chills, shakes, low blood pressure, and other flu-like symptoms. The symptoms are caused by chemicals called cytokines produced by the T-cells.

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Monday, October 17, 2011

An Immune System Trained to Kill Cancer

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PHILADELPHIA — A year ago, when chemotherapy stopped working against his leukemia, William Ludwig signed up to be the first patient treated in a bold experiment at the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Ludwig, then 65, a retired corrections officer from Bridgeton, N.J., felt his life draining away and thought he had nothing to lose.

Doctors removed a billion of his T-cells — a type of white blood cell that fights viruses and tumors — and gave them new genes that would program the cells to attack his cancer. Then the altered cells were dripped back into Mr. Ludwig’s veins.

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Saturday, October 15, 2011

Music Can Help Cancer Patients

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By Stacy Simon

Many people find listening to music relaxing, soothing, and enjoyable. For cancer patients, it also can be a way to cope with some of the symptoms of their disease and side effects of their treatment. New research supports listening to recorded music, as well as music therapy, to improve anxiety, pain, mood, quality of life, heart rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure in cancer patients.

Researchers from Drexel University reviewed 30 trials with a total of 1,891 participants. They included music therapy sessions with a trained music therapist and recorded music played by medical staff. Selections included relaxing music in categories that included classical, jazz, folk, rock, country and western, easy listening, new age, big band, Spanish and religious. The researchers were able to scientifically measure a significant improvement in anxiety and mood. They were also able to measure small improvements in heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure and pain.

Researchers did not have enough information to tell them whether music therapy or listening to recorded music was more effective. But they found that either technique improved cancer patients’ quality of life.

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Friday, October 14, 2011

Loosen up Nurses!!! Try this .... Teach me how to dougie

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Thursday, October 13, 2011

Long-Term Painkiller Use Linked to Kidney Cancer

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Sept. 12, 2011 -- Long-term, regular use of non-aspirin anti-inflammatory painkillers raises the likelihood of developing kidney cancer by more than 50%, a study shows.

The study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, suggests men and women who take such drugs are equally at risk.

Some smaller studies had previously shown a tentative link between painkillers and kidney cancer. But study researcher Eunyoung Cho, ScD, assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, says this is the largest study to look at the relationship between the disease and the class of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Drugs in this class include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), and Celebrex. Though aspirin is also an NSAID, no association has been found between kidney cancer and aspirin.

Cho says that the overall risk is still quite low. She does not think that people should stop taking NSAIDs in the short term or that doctors should stop recommending them to patients who otherwise benefit from them.

Kidney cancer specialist Christopher W. Ryan, MD, who was not involved in the study, agrees.

"Occasional use for aches and pains is nothing to worry about," says Ryan, of Oregon Health and Science University's Knight Cancer Institute in Portland. "But one's risk of getting kidney cancer, even for a long-time user, is not high at all."

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Wednesday, October 12, 2011

BPA in Canned Foods: Should You Worry?

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An advocacy group committed to exposing and eliminating environmental risks for breast cancer has taken aim at canned foods popular among kids, reheating the debate on bisphenol A.

A new report from the Breast Cancer Fund reveals 12 canned soups and pastas found to contain BPA -- an estrogen-like chemical raising concern among experts for its potential health effects in children, infants and fetuses.

Topping the list was Campbell's Disney Princess Cool Shapes with 148 parts per billion. The average level across all 12 cans was 49 parts per billion.

"The findings of this report outline the urgent need to remove BPA from food packaging -- a major source of exposure to this toxic hormone disruptor -- especially in foods marketed to children," the report states.

BPA, a key ingredient in hard plastics and resins used to coat metal cans, made headlines in 2008 when it was shown to leach out of plastic when heated. The Canadian government responded by banning the chemical from baby bottles. In the United States, the federal government has not followed suit, but several local governments have and leading U.S. baby bottle manufacturers went BPA-free voluntarily. But the chemical continues to line the country's cans.

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Monday, October 10, 2011

Patients With Fatalistic Attitudes Have Lower Cancer Screening Rates

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According to a study published in a recent issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, colorectal cancer screening rates among people without financial means remain to be low despite free health care being offered. Psychologists suggest the cause may be an idea called 'cancer fatalism'.

Anne Miles, Ph.D., a lecturer in psychology at Birkbeck, University of London, stated that people who believed that the cancer screenings wouldn't help or they were going to die of cancer anyway, often ignore screening recommendations. She said:


"In England, the screenings are free and the subsequent health treatments are free as well, yet people of lower socioeconomic status still do not get screened. We wanted to find out what else was going on."

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Friday, October 7, 2011

Non-Disease Virus Kills Breast Cancer Cells In Lab

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A virus that infects humans without causing disease kills breast cancer cells in the laboratory. Researchers from Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) College of Medicine in the US, tested an unaltered form of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) on three different human breast cancer types representing different stages of cancer and found it targeted all of them. They hope by uncovering the pathways the virus uses to trigger cancer cell death, their work will lead to new targets for anti-cancer drugs. A paper on this work appeared recently in the journal Molecular Cancer.

In earlier studies, the team also showed that AAV2 promotes cell death in cervical cancer cells infected with human papillomavirus (HPV).

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Wednesday, October 5, 2011

4 Foods That Fight Breast Cancer.

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Organic forms of selenium, a trace mineral in plants and grain-fed animal protein, may guard against breast cancer by normalizing the body's circadian rhythms (the internal clock that regulates how many estrogen receptors -- often linked to the disease -- your cells produce). Get your beneficial daily dose, 55 micrograms, with the selenium-rich foods here and double down on their other health perks.

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Monday, October 3, 2011

Different Fruits And Vegetables Affect Cancer Risk In Different Parts Of Bowel

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Eating more apples is linked to lower risk of distal colon cancer, brassicas like cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli and Brussels sprouts are linked to lower risk of cancer in both the proximal and the distal colon, while on the other hand, drinking more fruit juice appears to raise the risk of rectal cancer, according to new research from Australia published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

The large bowel comprises the rectum (the part that terminates in the anus), the distal colon (next to the rectum, includes the descending colon, sigmoid colon, and large intestine), and the proximal colon (on the other side of the distal colon to the rectum, includes the cecum, appendix, ascending colon, hepatic flexure, transverse colon and splenic flexure).

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Saturday, October 1, 2011

Broccoli, Cabbage, Other Veggies May Protect Against Colon Cancer

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MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Eating fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of some colorectal cancers, according to a new study.

Austrailian researchers examined the diets of 918 colorectal cancer patients and 1,021 people with no history of the disease and found that consumption of certain vegetables and fruits were associated with a decreased risk of cancer in the proximal and distal colon -- that is, the upper and lower portions of the colon.

Consumption of brassica vegetables (also known as cole crops) such as broccoli, kale, cauliflower, turnips and cabbage, for example, appeared to reduce the risk of cancer in the upper colon, while both total fruit and vegetable intake (and total vegetable intake alone) reduced the risk of cancer in the lower colon.

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Slideshow Pictures: Ovarian Cancer Symptoms, Stages, Treatments and Risks

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READ MORE AND VIEW SLIDESHOW

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