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Sunday, May 31, 2009

June 2009 PRC Room Assignment (Manila Examinees)

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June 2009 PRC Room Assignment (Manila Examinees) June 2009 PRC Room Assignment (Manila Examinees) lylesantos PRC School, Building, and Room Assignments for nursing board examinees.







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More nurses, teachers will go abroad with pay hike rejection - recruiters

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By Mayen Jaymalin Updated May 25, 2009 12:00 AM

MANILA, Philippines - More Filipino nurses and teachers are likely to go abroad because of a pay hike rejection, the local recruitment industry reported yesterday.

House appropriations committee chairman Quirino Rep. Junie Cua said that the government’s soaring budget deficit could not afford a huge increase for the estimated 600,000 teachers and nurses nationwide.

Recruitment leaders said instead of working here, more Filipino professionals opt to go abroad for higher pay.

They noted that there are thousands of vacancies awaiting Filipino nurses, teachers and other professionals in the US and Middle East.

“Since they cannot expect any increase in pay here, many nurses and teachers will just work abroad,” recruitment officials said.

Congressmen led by Nueva Vizcaya Rep. Carlos Padilla had proposed a P13,000 increase in pay of nurses and teachers to help them cope with the financial crisis and stave off the exodus of Filipino professionals, but this was rejected due to the government’s lack of budget.

The low pay has compelled a lot of Filipino nurses and teachers to seek greener pastures abroad.

Based on a Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA) data, more than 130,000 nurses have left for abroad from 1992 to 2007.

During the same period, 8,000 teachers have also gone abroad mostly on immigrant visas, attracted by the huge difference in pay scale and permanent residency in the USA and other countries.

The Middle East alone has been increasing its demand for Filipino nurses with Saudi Arabia currently employing some 30,000 nurses.

The United Kingdom has also re-opened its door for the entry of foreign nurses, including Filipinos.

For the past two years thousands of Filipina nurses whether board or non-board passers have entered UK as student nurses and enrolled in various universities while working part-time in care homes and hospitals.

SOURCE: More nurses, teachers will go abroad with pay hike rejection - recruiters





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Japan bound health workers get advices from officials

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Two hundred and seventy Filipino nurses and caregivers will be boarding planes on Sunday that would take them to a country which offers the chance to improve not just their careers but the lives of their families as well.

Japan Ambassador to the Philippines Makoto Katsura said the departure of the first batch of Filipino nurses and caregivers under the Japan-Philippine Economic Partnership Agreement (JPEPA) “marks a truly historic event as it will be the first time for Japan to accept Filipino nurses and caregivers”.

Katsura wished all the candidates a safe trip and at the same time advised them to be prepared as they will be working with an “entirely different environment and people with different culture and language”.

“You may encounter problems along the way but I'm quite confident that with the positive and optimistic attitude you will overcome the difficulties in the end,” Katsura said.

Labor and Employment Assistant Secretary Reydeluz Conferido echoed the same advice urging the Filipino healthcare workers to always be prepared.

“Nurses and Filipino caregivers have long been appreciated for quality service, for kindheartedness, for diligence, for patience, for caring and all the good attributes of the Filipinos. Please do not forget to display or manifest those characteristics even in the most challenging of times and circumstances which probably will also come,” Conferido said.

The former labor attaché to Japan said that the first batch of nurses and caregivers will be contributing to both countries.

“I hope with your contributions more doors will be opened and the respect for the Filipinos will be reinforced,” he said.

“I hope you will be also firm in asserting your dignity. I hope that you will not tolerate disrespect and I hope that you will cooperate very closely with the Filipino community in Japan, with our embassy, our consulate in Osaka and with the labor attaché,” he said.

Foreign Affairs Assistant Secretary Ronald Allarey, meanwhile, gave the assurance that the government will continue to protect and promote their interest and well being “at home and abroad.”

“I sincerely hope that you will always remember your important role in nation building and that more than being workers, you are without a doubt, our country's veritable ambassadors showing talent, excellence, compassion and goodwill and in promoting the richness of the Filipino culture to Japan and to the rest of the world,” Allarey said.
Adjusting to a new culture, way of life, and learning the language are not just the concerns of the nurses and caregivers bound for Japan. Some say that separation from their loved ones is one of the hardest challenges that they face.

While 32-year-old Serlun Kiat Da Jose feels lucky to be among the 270 Filipino healthcare workers to leave for Japan on May 10, just the thought about the children she would have to leave behind makes her smile fade.

The single mother of two worked as a nurse at a rural health unit in Echague, Santiago, Isabela before she took the opportunity to apply for work in Japan.

Although it has been her dream to work abroad, the offer to work in Japan seems to be the most ideal for her. At first, the idea of overseas employment worried her because her two children are with her, and the exorbitant placement fees she would need to raise seemed to be impossible.

“Ito, yung opportunity, libre lahat parang ok,” she told reporters during the pre-flight briefing of the first batch of health workers held Friday afternoon at the Occupational Safety and Health Center in Quezon City.

Like most overseas Filipino workers before her, she considered the future of her family when she made the decision to apply for the position as caregiver.

“I'm a single mom separated for five years parang ang hirap kasi maging single parent ka,” she said adding “Mixed emotions kasi alam ko magkakaroon ng magandang future kami ng mga anak ko pero syempre mahirap kasi magkakahiwa-hiwalay kami. First time naming magkaka-hiwalay na mag-iina. But I know God will take care of the rest, anyway this is for them and for their future”.

Serlun took to the podium to address officials of both countries and her fellow candidates. She thanked the Japanese government for the program and Philippine officials for being supportive and understanding.

“We promise to do our best, to work hard, behave, and carry the Filipino culture and values wherever we are assigned in Japan. Again, pray for us in our journey as we pray for you and your family,” she said.

Analiza Catacutan Manalastas has the same feelings of mixed emotions about working in Japan.

"I'm happy because I have a chance to grow in my profession. I'm sad because I'm leaving my kids," she said.

Manalastas first worked as a private nurse earning P10,000 and then moved to Fabella Hospital in 2005 to earn P13,000.

"It's the fear of the unknown. I don't know what to expect. Can I adjust to their culture? The POEA had a briefing and that eased my anxiety," she added.

For his part, candidate nurse Joseph Shierel Benosa views the opportunity as a challenge to “show the Japanese people why we Filipinos are known as quality health care givers in the world”.

“It is a challenge and an opportunity given to us by Japan and now our battlecry is ‘Yes! The Filipino can deliver as expected," Benosa said.

In another interview, candidate caregiver Rosie Agupe, 36, changed her mind about working in Saudi Arabia when the opportunity to earn more arrived.

The native of Antique admitted that this is going to be her first trip abroad but she is confident that she will be fine in Japan.

“Marami naman akong pinsan na nakapunta na sa Japan. Saka government to government naman ang transaction,” she told abs-cbnNEWS.com

Nurse Jesse Rey Perina Cruel had a feel of what it is like to work abroad. Cruel, 25, previously worked in Qatar. He came home in January and grabbed the opportunity to work in Japan.

Unfortunately, Cruel is 10-month short of the three-year work experience needed for nursing applicants. He applied as a caregiver instead.

"In Japan I will be assigned to a [tertiary] hospital. In Qatar, I'm in a secondary hospital. I think the technology in Japan is better than in the Middle East," he said

He is also confident that he can learn the Japanese language. "We will have six months training. I think culture will be the bigger challenge."

The Philippine Overseas Employment Administration said that of the 280 healthcare workers to leave this month, 92 are nurses and 188 are caregivers. They were hired by 134 Japanese institutions and facilities through the Japan International Corporations of Welfare Services (JICWELS), the POEA’s counterpart.

Ten Filipinos from the same batch have been exempted from taking the six-month Japanese language training. They are set to depart for Japan on May 31.

Meanwhile, the rest of the batch, or the 270 health workers, will enroll in the course of training in five designated language institutions a day after their arrival in Japan.

The Filipino nurses will be allowed to take Kangoshi (nurse) licensure examinations on February 2010. Caregivers, however, need at least three years of work experience in Japan before taking the national certification examination for kaigofukushishi (caregiver).

SOURCE: Japan bound health workers get advices from officials



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Filipino nurses’ body gets new office-bearers

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Source ::: The Peninsula/ BY CHRIS V PANGANIBAN

DOHA: The new officials of Occupational Health Nurses Association of the Philippines –Qatar Chapter (OHNAP-Qatar) were formally sworn into office last night during a gala programme at the Doha Grand Hotel.

The new OHNAP officials were inducted by Sitti Tawffiya Jamal Paradji, Cultural Attache at the Philippine Embassy in Qatar.

The new OHNAP officials are: Willard Amper, President; Charlie Guilles, Vice President for Membership; Mary Jane Palencia, Secretary; Anna Liza Briza, Deputy Secretary, Vilma Bote, Treasurer; Aileen Bacalso, Deputy Treasurer; Danilo Granados and Arnel Casareo, Press Relations Officers; Arnold Cabon, Auditor; Lester Latina, Deputy Auditor; Raul Juanatas, Business Manager; and Felipe Ruiz and Randy Apines, Sergeants At Arms.

Seventy new members were also inducted during the induction ceremonies.



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Friday, May 29, 2009

Nursing Skills: Administering an Intradermal Injection (Videos)

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Tuesday, May 26, 2009

June 2009 NLE Quick Results Subscription

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Sunday, May 24, 2009

Nursing Skills: Resetting an IV Bag (Videos)

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PRC Baguio June 2009 Nursing Licensure Examination NLE Room Assignment

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Below are the room assignments for those nurses taking the June 2009 Nursing Licensure Examination in Baguio. Room assignments for other cities will be posted as soon as it is published by the PRC.

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Baguio NLE June 2009 Room Assignments





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‘Special’ immigrant visas for nurses

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Last week we posted an article about the possibility of staying and working in the U.S. legally if you are here on a tourist visa, which involves finding a willing employer to sponsor your H-1B nonimmigrant working visa.

Early this week, two Filipino tourists who are registered nurses in the Philippines inquired if they can be sponsored by an employer and work here under the H-1B visa program, since there is an acute need for medical workers, in particular, RNs, in the U.S.

It is true that there is a big demand for health workers simply because there are not enough medical workers to fill up these positions. Even with the rising number of schools, hospitals and other medical facilities, the U.S. keeps recruiting medical workers and is in fact even hiring health professionals from other countries, including the Philippines.

Despite the need however, nurses and other medical professionals are not considered “specialty occupations” as I had described last week. Specialty occupations are the prerequisite for an H-1B visa, which means that there should be an underlying uniqueness in the occupation that allows foreigners to fill these positions.

You don’t need to be a linguist to perform your duties as a nurse. You don’t have to learn special unique skills in this job category. On the contrary, the medical profession is universal. Thus, it doesn’t qualify as an H-1B profession. (For more information, please visit www.balita.com and click on Atty. James G. Beirne on immigration.)

But what’s special with medical workers – in this case the Filipino nurses – is that there seems to be a wide acceptance of these health workers from the Philippines in most U.S. hospitals. Not only are they getting paid handsomely, Filipinos here in the U.S. and especially in the Philippines have been looking to become nurses if not urging their sons and daughters to become one. And who would’ve thought that some doctors in the Philippines would even go back to medical school to become a nurse? (Unfortunately, unlike nurses, Filipino doctors can’t just come here and work as doctors. U.S. doctors have very restrictive rules that prevent the entry of foreign doctors.)

Be that as it may, the “special” immigrant visa for nurses and physical therapists called Schedule A that allowed them to come to the U.S. has quickly been used up – 50,000 immigrant visas in all. In May 2005, Schedule A visas were mandated by Congress because of the nursing shortage by allocating unused immigrant visas from 2001-2004. That law provided for the exemption of nurses and physical therapists who could be employed without going through what used to be a laborious labor certification process. Many Filipino nurses took advantage of this special immigrant visa and many of them arrived straight from the Philippines and were able to get their immigrant visas in a short time.

It was in January 2007 when the remaining number of these visas was made available. Even then, the priority date for Schedule A workers was June 15, 2004. Since then, there have been no congressional actions to reinstate the Schedule A in spite of the need for medical workers and lobbying from the health industry. Thus, all nurses and physical therapists have since been subject to immigrant visa quotas under the Employment-Based Third Preference (EB3) category. And unfortunately, at this time, this category has been oversubscribed and remains unavailable for Filipinos and other countries.

However, we still encourage nurses from the Philippines to find a willing employer in the U.S. if they are already here so that a petition can be filed even if there are no available visas. A petition filed will give you a priority date and once they become available you assure yourself of a number and a place in line.


SOURCE


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Friday, May 22, 2009

Pinoy nurses rally to save jobs, hospital in US

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Filipino nurses are now fighting to save not only their jobs but also the hospital where they work in California.

The nurses rallied in front of the Alameda County Board of Supervisors Office in Oakland, last Tuesday to protest the closure of San Leandro Hospital where they worked.

"I work here for five days full time and I don’t have any other work so it’s going to affect me and my family," said Filipino nurse Mildred Causing.

More than half of the 250 nurses at the hospital are Filipino.

"Kahit registered nurse ngayon mahihirapan pa din humanap ng trabaho dahil marami ang uninsured at sa palagay ko mahina ang bayad ng medical, medicare sa mga hospital," said another Filipina nurse Dolorita Malixi.

The nurses said they want to save San Leandro Hospital because it is the only fully-functioning acute care hospital in the area.

"If we are not there then where will those people go?” said Betty Micu.

The California Nurses Association which represents the nurses accused Sutter Health of closing hospitals in medically underserved areas.

“I think this is Sutter's modus operandi they come in and they purchase the hospital and they make promises to the community that they'll make services open and they almost immediately start to plan how to close services in areas that have less insured patients, the underserved areas in favor of building up in areas where people are more affluent," said the association’s spokesperson Jan Rodolfo.

According to reports, Sutter said that in the month of February alone the hospital lost US$1.5 million. Sutter said that while it is still evaluating the hospital's financial health, it said it’s clear that they cannot offer the services they do right now and stay in business.

SOURCE: https://abs-cbnnews.com/pinoy-migration/04/30/09/pinoy-nurses-rally-save-jobs-hospital-us


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Thursday, May 21, 2009

Nursing Skills: Priming an IV Bag (Videos)

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Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Nursing Skills: Drawing From an Ampule (Videos)

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Monday, May 18, 2009

Half-cocked foreign health worker scheme has a long way to go

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Japan is wavering over its acceptance of foreign nurses and care workers. Filipino nurses and care workers have come to Japan in accordance with the Japan-Philippines economic partnership agreement (EPA), but their numbers are far below that initially planned. This is due to the difficulties in obtaining licenses in Japan, and medical and care facilities' reluctance to accept foreign workers as the government has implemented measures to encourage them to accept those who have lost their jobs amid the global recession.

The Philippines is the second country to send trainee nurses and care workers to Japan under a bilateral EPA, following Indonesia. Japan plans to accept up to 1,000 Filipino nurses and care workers as trainees over a two-year period, almost equal to those from Indonesia. The workers are supposed to work at medical and care facilities as trainees after learning Japanese and undergoing introductory courses for six months.

Nurses are allowed to undergo on-the-job training for up to three years, while nursing care workers are permitted to do so for the maximum of four years. If they take state examinations and obtain Japanese licenses, they will be allowed to continue to work in Japan. Those who fail will be ordered to go home.

The number of applicants far outstripped the number of positions available, but the number of those who actually made it to Japan was far smaller than it should have been, due to various problems.

Firstly, it is difficult for foreign workers to obtain licenses in Japan, as they are required to take state examinations in Japanese. The pass rate of state examinations for care worker licenses is around 50 percent even among Japanese applicants, and foreign applicants must learn enough Japanese to sufficiently understand the contents of the examinations.

Secondly, institutions that accept these trainees are required to bear certain financial burdens. The Japanese government foots trainees' travel expenses and costs of undergoing Japanese-language training, but medical and care facilities must pay for subsequent on-the-job training and wages. Bosses are reluctant to accept foreign trainees for fears they will get no return on their investment if they fail the exams.

But the biggest problem is that the government has not yet clarified basic policy on accepting foreign workers. The government maintains that its acceptance of Filipino nurses and care workers is part of the bilateral economic exchange, and not intended to make up for workforce shortages. It has failed to clarify the direction of the bilateral economic exchange in the future, which has discouraged the operators of medical and nursing institutions from accepting foreign workers.

The government estimates that Japan must double the number of care workers by 2025 as the population ages. To that end, Japan must increase the number of care workers by 70,000 to 80,000 each year, but achieving this goal appears unlikely. The time has come when Japan must determine how many foreign workers it should accept and how it should accept them, but discussions on the issue have not even started.

A haphazard approach will be deadlocked in the end. The government is urged to work out basic policy on the acceptance of foreign nurses and care workers and deal with challenges, such as hurdles for accepting them that have already surfaced.


SOURCE: http://mdn.mainichi.jp/perspectives/news/20090516p2a00m0na013000c.html



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Nursing Skills: Advanced Physical Assessment Part II (Videos)

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List of International Nurse Recruitment Agencies

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List of US Based Nurse Recruiting Firms
The following firms specialize in recruiting foreign trained nurses for positions to the USA.

ADEX Medical Staffing –full service agency.


Alda Professional Placement Services- assist with placement in various countries.

All About Staffing, Inc- an affiliate of HCA Hospital, no agency fees, visa sponsorship.



ASMCI USA – assist with NCLEX, IELTS or TOEFL prep, no agency fees.

Assignment America –affiliated with Cross Country, offers full service assistance.



Bonacare USA -full service agency specializing in recruiting nurses from Korea.

Cambridge Healthcare – CGFNS certification requirement, assist with NCLEX and visa filing.



Carex Global Recruitment – full service international agency, no agency fees.

CBH Healthcare Recruiters – full service agency includes on the job training.



Christine Paris Enterprises USA Inc -full service agency, placements also in Australia and UK.

CMS - Comprehensive Medical Staffing – full service agency, assist with filing application.



CNERGI – offers reimbursement for immigration costs, no agency fees.

DB Healthcare – full service agency includes visa filing and reimbursement of requirements.



DirectSource Healthcare – works with recruitment firms & assists with nurse placements.

European Medical Staffing – full service agency, not limited to European RN recruitment.



Global Healthcare Resources – full service agency, focuses on cultural transition program.

Global Nursing Solutions –full service agency, refund of NCLEX/IELTS fees.



Global Nurse Recruiters Corporation –full service agency, reimbursement of immigration fees.

USA Global Nurses Network- full service agency specializing in recruiting Indian nurses.



GlobalNursesOnline.com –full service agency, placements in the US and UK.

Global Nursing International –full service agency, full benefits package



Global RNSource – specializes in California placements.

GlobeMed Resources –reimburses cost of exams, immigration, & travel, focus on Indian RN.



HCCA International – full service agency since 1973. Full benefits package.

Healthcare Resources International –assistance with immigration process and placement.



HealthStar International –full service agency, over 450 nurses placed in the US.

HMI - Health Management – CGFNS and IELTS required for placement.



Institute of California Bilingual Medical Staffing – specializes in bilingual RNs from Mexico.

International MedLink – full service agency, CGFNS required, unique Vanderbilt training.



Job2Career –full service agency, very established presence in India.

JUNO Healthcare Staffing -NCLEX or CGFNS required, assistance & placement.



Kennedy Healthcare Recruiting –full service international recruiting agency.

Medliant – full service agency, reimbursement of immigration fees, travel, etc.



Nurses to USA – full service agency specializing in nurse recruitment in the Philippines.

Nursing USA, Inc. - full service international recruiting agency.



O'Grady Peyton International- full service agency, over 25 years of experience in recruiting.

Onward Healthcare – agency with per diem, travel and international recruitment programs.



Pacific Link Healthcare – full service international recruiting agency since 1999.

PPR Healthcare - agency with travel, permanent & international recruitment programs.



Premier Healthcare Professionals –agency with travel and international programs.

Professional Healthcare Resources – agency specializing in hospice care placements.



RCM Health Care Services –full service international recruiting agency.

RN India – full service international agency specializing in recruiting RNs from India.



RYMEK – full service international agency specializing in recruiting RNs from the Philippines.

Sentosa Recruitment Agency –direct hire for Sentosa Healthcare, full service agency.



Strategic Nurse Staffing -specializes in placement of international RNs throughout US.

Stateside Nursing International – full service international recruitment agency since 1996.



TGS Health Care Solutions, LLC – full service international recruitment agency.

Transpacific Nursing – full service international recruitment agency.



Universal Worker – full service international recruitment agency.

US Medical Staff Inc. – full service international recruitment agency.



Vital Care Solution, Inc.- agency focused on placements in CA.

Wilson Staffing Network – agency with domestic & international recruitment programs.



WorldWide HealthStaff Associates – full service international recruitment agency.

Worldwide Resources Network, Inc -full service international recruitment agency.






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Sunday, May 17, 2009

Nursing Skills: Advanced Physical Assessment, Part I (Videos)

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This is a demonstration of how to perform more advanced, second-level physical examination of a patient. Included on part I is general survey and neurologic assessment.








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Passing June 2009 Nursing Board Exam

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Looking back at some of the articles I have written a few months back for students taking on their Nursing Licensure Exams on how to pass the NLE. Here is some articles that I sure will help you pass this June 2009 NLE.

1. How to pass the Nursing Board Exam (NLE)

2. Nursing Licensure Examination Review Materials

3. NLE Practice Test

4. Important Stuff To Read Before Taking The Nursing Board Exam

5. All About Nursing Board Exam NLE


As we get closer to the exam, I advise nurses who are taking the June 2009 NLE to spend most of their time answering questions and now anymore read theories and procedures. By answering past Nursing Board Exam questions, you are sharpening your skill in analyzing the question. It will improve your comprehension skills which is very important.



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Saturday, May 16, 2009

Filipino nurses to organise talk on patient safety

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Web posted at: 5/10/2009 3:35:16
Source ::: The PENINSULA/ BY CHRIS V PANGANIBAN

DOHA: To mark International Nurses Day, Filipino occupational health nurses in Qatar will organise a meeting on May 29 at the Doha Grand Hotel, the highlight of which will be a lecture by an expert.

Willard Amper, president of Occupational Health Nurses Association of the Philippines --Qatar Chapter (OHNAP-Qatar), said the expert will be discussing ‘International Patient Safety Goals’ during her talk at the meeting.

International Nurses Day is celebrated around the world every May 12, the birth anniversary of Florence Nightingale, who is widely considered the founder of modern nursing.

Amper said new members of OHNAP-Qatar are expected to attend the meeting since they want to be updated about new trends in their profession. He added that their group was formed to raise professional nursing standards through continuing education and social service.

Two guests from the Philippine Women’s University’s College of Nursing, Dr Jose Gonzales and Dr Celeste Dimaculangan, are expected to grace the event, where they will make a presentation on the university’s distance education programme.

The OHNAP-Qatar has about 30 active members but more people have expressed interest in joining the organisation. The OHNAP-Qatar has been holding such events for the past six years, which has helped its members upgrade their expertise. Apart from value-addition training, the nurses’ group has also been extending community services to residents. The group has been carrying out a medical outreach programme for skilled workers living in the industrial area, where it conducts free check ups for blood pressure and blood sugar.







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Nursing Skills: Patient Turning and Transfers (Videos)

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This is a demonstration of how to assist a patient to a side-lying position, transfer to a wheelchair, and use a walker with gait-belt assistance.








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Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Nursing Skills: Making an Occupied Bed (Videos)

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This is a demonstration of how to make an occupied bed.






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Monday, May 11, 2009

Nearly 400 RP nurses, caregivers leaving for Japan

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MANILA, Philippines - Close to 400 Filipino nurses and caregivers are leaving for Japan this weekend, the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA) reported yesterday.

POEA administrator Jennifer Manalili said the workers would be the first batch of Filipino nurses and caregivers to be deployed under the Japan-Philippine Economic Partnership Agreement (JPEPA).

“A total of 358 nurses and caregivers who qualified to work in Japan are set to leave either on Friday or Saturday,” Manalili said.

The POEA and the Japan International Corporation of Welfare Services (JICWELS) earlier entered into a memorandum of understanding (MOU) providing for the recruitment of 1,000 Filipino nurses and caregivers for the next two years.

Under the agreement, an initial batch of 200 Filipino nurses and 300 caregivers would be recruited to work in hospitals and institutions in Japan.

Manalili said the newly hired nurses and caregivers would still undergo a six-month language and culture training, during which they would receive allowance of not less than 40,000 yen, or more than P21,000 per month.

During their three-year stay in Japan, the Filipino nurses are allowed to take the licensure examination and become full-fledged nurses in Japan.

After passing the licensure or certification examinations, the nurse would have the option of staying for an unlimited period in Japan to practice based on new and upgraded employment contract with their employer.

Registered nurses with at least three years’ experience were recruited to work for training and employment in Japan while the caregivers were graduates of a four-year course and certified by the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA).

Even with the agreement, Manalili stressed less than 500 nurses and caregivers would be deployed since Japanese health institutions have refrained from hiring new workers because of the prevailing global financial crisis.

Manalili said POEA is working for a bigger batch of workers to be deployed to Japan.

“We are working to fill up a total of 1,000 workers with bigger number of health workers to be deployed in the next batch,” Manalili said.

SOURCE



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Filipino nurses still welcome to work in NZ

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INQUIRER.net
First Posted 13:32:00 05/07/2009

Filed Under: Nursing matters, Overseas Employment, Migration

MANILA, Philippines—Filipino nurses are still welcome in New Zealand, executives of the New Zealand Nursing Council told the Department of Foreign Affairs and the Association of Deans of Philippine Colleges of Nursing.

The DFA, which met with the Council’s chief executive Carolyn Reed and registration manager Andrea McCance, on Thursday said the assurance was made following some media reports that New Zealand is questioning the competence of Filipino nurses.

In a statement, the DFA said the executives also expressed regret about the report, which Reed said were based on remarks made by those not connected with either the Council or the New Zealand government.

Council officials, who also met separately with officials of the Professional Regulation Commission and the Commission on Higher Education, said Filipino nurse candidates to their country are able to hurdle the prescribed bridging program.

They also cited the “very low” failure rate in the required competency assessment program.

McCance said her office has been trying to simplify the process for qualified foreign nurses to work in New Zealand. Among the steps they have taken are: provide more complete information on its website and allow staggered completion of required International English Language Testing System, which may also be taken here in the Philippines.

Council officials also said the issuance of residency visas is beyond the scope of their work. They said a foreign nurse registered with the Council should present such registration in support of a separate proper residency status application with New Zealand immigration authorities.

They said the Council also encourages direct applications rather than coursing registration through recruitment agencies.

The DFA encouraged the Philippine Nurses Association and the Association of Deans of Philippine Colleges of Nursing to have school registrars identify and match subjects with foreign government requirements on the applicant’s transcript of records.

The department said this would facilitate the evaluation of individuals who will practice nursing in New Zealand.

Those who met with the New Zealand officials were DFA Asian and Pacific Affairs director J. Susana Paez and Office of the Undersecretary for International Economic Relations director Eric Gerardo Tamayo, as well as Dr. Teresita Barcelo, president of the Philippine Colleges of Nursing.

Philippine Ambassador to New Zealand Bienvenido Tejano suggested the visit in response to the Council’s expression of desire to undertake consultations with their Filipino counterparts.

Filipinos comprise the second largest number of foreign nurses in New Zealand, with about 200 nurses registered every year.



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280 Filipino nurses, caregivers to start skills training in Japan

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Japan has agreed to accept 92 nurses and 188 caregivers from the Philippines, the first group of Filipino health workers to get free language and skills training in Japan, Japanese and Philippine officials said Friday. Reydeluz Conferido of the Philippine Department of Labor and Employment said 270 health workers will leave for Japan on Sunday for six months of language and skills training at various hospitals and care facilities in Japan, while the remaining 10 will leave later this month.

During the first six months, Conferido said the 280 candidates will learn the Japanese language and familiarize themselves with the Japanese hospital and care system. Thousands of Filipino job seekers applied online when news broke early this year that Japan needs nurses and caregivers to take care of its ageing population.

The 134 Japanese institutions and facilities that applied through the Japan International Corporation of Welfare Services, a semi-governmental organization, have agreed to provide free skills training to the 280 Filipino health workers.

SOURCE


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Filipino nurses to organise talk on patient safety

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Web posted at: 5/10/2009 3:35:16
Source ::: The PENINSULA/ BY CHRIS V PANGANIBAN

DOHA: To mark International Nurses Day, Filipino occupational health nurses in Qatar will organise a meeting on May 29 at the Doha Grand Hotel, the highlight of which will be a lecture by an expert.

Willard Amper, president of Occupational Health Nurses Association of the Philippines --Qatar Chapter (OHNAP-Qatar), said the expert will be discussing ‘International Patient Safety Goals’ during her talk at the meeting.

International Nurses Day is celebrated around the world every May 12, the birth anniversary of Florence Nightingale, who is widely considered the founder of modern nursing.

Amper said new members of OHNAP-Qatar are expected to attend the meeting since they want to be updated about new trends in their profession. He added that their group was formed to raise professional nursing standards through continuing education and social service.

Two guests from the Philippine Women’s University’s College of Nursing, Dr Jose Gonzales and Dr Celeste Dimaculangan, are expected to grace the event, where they will make a presentation on the university’s distance education programme.

The OHNAP-Qatar has about 30 active members but more people have expressed interest in joining the organisation. The OHNAP-Qatar has been holding such events for the past six years, which has helped its members upgrade their expertise. Apart from value-addition training, the nurses’ group has also been extending community services to residents. The group has been carrying out a medical outreach programme for skilled workers living in the industrial area, where it conducts free check ups for blood pressure and blood sugar.

THE PENINSULA



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Nursing Skills: Wound Irrigation and Culture and Wet-to-Dry Dressing Change (Videos)

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Demonstration of a sterile irrigation and culture collection from a patient\'s abdominal wound. Followed by a clean-technique wet-to-dry dressing change.








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Sunday, May 10, 2009

Nursing Skills: Giving a Patient a Bed Bath (Videos)

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This is a demonstration of how to give a patient a bath while they are in bed.








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Friday, May 8, 2009

Nursing Skills: Central Lines and IV Push and Piggyback Medications (Videos)

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Demonstration of how to connect IV push and IV piggyback medications to a central line. Illustration of the function of a multilumen central line.







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Wednesday, May 6, 2009

Many UK nurses quit for Australia

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he Royal College of Nursing has warned that too many UK nurses are being lured to work in Australia.

Last year almost 5,000 nurses formally signalled an intention to find work in Australian hospitals.

The RCN's head of policy conceded nurses were receiving attractive offers, but said the UK still needed the nurses it was training.

The Australian recruitment drive comes as the number of foreign nurses seeking work in the UK is falling.


There is a belief that in the UK we don't need the nurses we've got - but we know we do need them
Howard Catton
Royal College of Nursing

Howard Catton, the RCN's head of policy, told the BBC he had met employers who had come to the UK to recruit 60 nurses at a time - but had ended up making offers to double that number.

Mr Catton said the efforts were founded on a belief that there was unemployment among NHS nurses - but the UK still needed the staff it was training.

He said: "The Australians have stepped up their recruitment activity on the basis of what they believe is unemployment and downsizing in the UK.

"There is a belief that in the UK we don't need the nurses we've got - but we know we do need them.

"The Australian recruitment agencies that I've spoken to since I've been here are making very attractive offers.

"It's not just the starting salaries. The packages include air travel - for nurses' families as well - relocation expenses, temporary accommodation and the promise that they'll support an application for permanent residency.

"A couple of employers even offer a 'meet and greet' service at the airport with chauffeur-driven limousines, so the nurses are made to feel welcome as soon as their feet touch the ground.

"Nurses have always historically left the UK and gone to Australia but the numbers have doubled recently.

"We still believe there are nursing shortages in the UK - both in the NHS and the private sector."

Many retirements

Recent figures suggested that hundreds of newly-qualified nurses and midwives are struggling to find work in the NHS months after graduating.

However, the RCN has warned that with 180,000 nurses due to retire in the next decade and immigration restrictions on overseas nurses in place, NHS demand for nurses will intensify.

But the Department of Health did not share the RCN's sense of alarm.

A spokesperson said: "The NHS has the nurses it needs. The supply position is healthy, vacancies are very low.

"Nursing has always been a mobile profession. The UK benefits from international nurses coming to work in the NHS, whilst some UK nurses take the opportunity to travel and experience working in healthcare around the globe."

SOURCE



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Tuesday, May 5, 2009

Foreign Nurses Can Fall Communication Gap

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It’s not politically correct — but it’s a frequent complaint of hospital patients in Las Vegas: “The nurses don’t speak English!”

The complaint is inaccurate. Foreign nurses working in Las Vegas do speak English. All have passed English language competency exams to become licensed in Nevada.

But the complaint also contains an element of truth. More than 15 percent of the Las Vegas nursing workforce is internationally trained, about five times the national average of 3.5 percent, according to an expert at UNLV. Most of these nurses are from Asian countries — the Philippines, India, Japan and Korea. Their English is often heavily accented and they may not understand the nuances of American culture and lingo — which can create challenges for patients and doctors.

Consider the experience of Nancy Menzel, a registered nurse and associate professor of nursing at UNLV. When Menzel was a patient in a Las Vegas hospital, the nurse needed to note every time she urinated, but she had a funny way of asking.

“You go pee pee?” the nurse asked Menzel throughout the night. “You go pee pee?”

“She may have been a wonderful nurse, but it didn’t come across that way,” Menzel said.

The nationwide shortage of nurses is particularly acute in Las Vegas, one of America’s fastest growing cities in the past 20 years. Nevada’s nurse-to-population ratio is among the worst in the country and Las Vegas hospitals have adapted by employing foreign nurses.

Yu “Philip” Xu, a professor at UNLV’s school of nursing who is originally from China, has studied the phenomenon in depth and has developed a unique training program to address the challenges.

Xu’s research has shown that foreign nurses have a difficult transition to the American health care system. A study he conducted on Chinese nurses in the United States found they often felt socially isolated and paralyzed by their communication inadequacies.

Xu recalled his own experience working as a nurse in Alabama. One time he asked a patient how she liked her food and she replied: “It’s as good as grits.”

The woman wasn’t eating grits, and though Xu knew what grits were, he had no idea why the woman was comparing her meal to them.

Debra Scott, executive director of the Nevada Board of Nursing, emphasized that the nurses speak English but may be unfamiliar with cultural idioms. She recalled a foreign nurse who thought she would be working with dead people because she had been assigned to the graveyard shift.

“It can be difficult for people who speak English-only to work with a nurse who has those cultural differences and an accent,” Scott said.

On the flip side, Scott noted that Las Vegas is a diverse city and foreign nurses can enhance care through their language skills and ability to relate to patients who share their heritage.

Foreign nurses are also forced to adjust to differences in the job description in the United States, Xu’s research has shown. Asian nurses are accustomed to family members doing tasks like bathing and feeding the patient, and may feel such jobs are beneath their level of education, one of his studies found.

In addition, many international nurses are not accustomed to the amount of independent judgment and time spent documenting medical care that’s required by the American system, his studies said.

Language and communication problems can have a direct effect on the quality of patient care, and on the perceptions patients have of their care, Xu said. An estimated 100,000 people die every year as the result of medical errors in the United States, and communication problems are believed to be a leading cause. Xu said it’s impossible to know how much internationally trained nurses contribute to medical errors because the area is grossly understudied.

“We are not saying by any stretch that foreign nurses are not providing quality care,” Xu said. “They are providing good care. But they do have challenges — based on the literature and anecdotal evidence and my experience.”

Two local hospitals — Spring Valley Hospital Medical Center and Desert Springs Hospital Medical Center — are positioning themselves as leaders in improving the performance of foreign nurses by participating in a study and training program developed by Xu in partnership with the Nevada Nursing Board.

About 72 nurses are in a program called Speak for Success, which included 10 weeks of training with a speech pathologist to reduce accents and four seminars to increase the understanding of American culture. The participating nurses were pre-tested months ago and then post-tested last week, and the results of the nurses who received the training will be compared to a control group who did not.

Officials from Spring Valley, where about 20 percent of the nursing staff is internationally trained, are sensitive about the program. They emphasized their commitment to help nurses improve their communication skills but were reluctant to admit that poor communication ever poses a problem.

On Medicare surveys, patients have ranked the communication of the nurses at the two hospitals poorly. The percentage of patients who said their nurses “always” communicated well was 46 percent at Desert Springs and 51 percent at Spring Valley, according to the Medicare survey. The Medicare surveys do not report anything regarding the nationality of the nursing staff. Hospital officials said the survey results are at least 9 months old, and that they’ve seen improvements in the survey results since starting Xu’s training program.

Dr. Jim Christensen, head of performance improvement at Spring Valley, said the communication challenges posed by foreign nurses are obvious, but that they are clinically sound. He commended the hospitals for working to improve their performance.

Amy Nassar is the speech pathologist involved in Xu’s study of communication skills. Although the results haven’t been compiled, Nassar said she noticed improvement in the nurses. The pre-testing found a wide range of skill levels, but the post-testing found that nurses who had attended classes were conscious of their pronunciation and careful not to make mistakes, she said.

On Friday, an Spring Valley nurse named Raphi Puthiyaveettil, an Indian nurse who has been in the United States for about three years, conducted his post-test in a role playing exercise with an actress portraying a hospitalized patient. As he conducted his assessment, there were occasions where his accent garbled words or his cadence was mixed-up: “I’m Raphi, I’ll be the nurse assigned to you today morning, for your case.”

But it was also clear that Puthiyaveettil was personable and brought a depth of clinical knowledge to the exam. In the scenario, the patient was diabetic, so he explained her blood sugar levels and the importance of diet and exercise.

He said after the test that the UNLV training program has provided him with a deeper understanding of American culture that will benefit his work at the hospital.

Xu said it’s uncertain when the research results will be published.

SOURCE



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Sunday, May 3, 2009

Nursing agency thinks globally

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David Bartholomew has spent two decades in the staffing business, cutting his teeth with a company that placed temporary workers in jobs ranging from warehouse worker to computer programmer.
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Earlier this year, Bartholomew relinquished his chief executive role with Staffmark, the temporary staffing agency that he helped get off the ground nearly 20 years ago, after it merged with CBS/Venturi.

Now, Bartholomew has landed as president at HCCA International, a Nashville-based medical staffing agency that recruits nurses and other health-care professionals internationally and places them at U.S. hospitals.

He comes to the company at a time when U.S. policy has sharply curtailed HCCA's ability to bring in foreign nurses on green cards as temporary workers. That has reduced HCCA International's revenue and sent the company scrambling to lobby for changes in Washington. Bartholomew discussed his background in staffing and his company's evolving business strategy with Tennessean Business Editor Randy McClain.

What's the biggest issue you face as you take over as president of HCCA International?

Retrogression is a term the U.S. government uses to describe when more people apply in a certain category for a visa to enter the country than there are visas available. And that's starting to affect the international recruitment of nurses. We have a backlog of nurses for whom we have jobs, but they can't get into the country.

All the nurses who want to work in the United States can't get into the country even though we have a shortage of nurses here. By any estimate, we have a shortage somewhere between 300,000 to 400,000 nurses nationwide. By 2020, estimates are that the United States will have a shortage of more than 1 million nurses.

President Barack Obama recently called for more training of U.S. nurses at colleges to plug the nursing shortage. Does his stance suggest it will remain difficult to get enough entry permits for foreign nurses to come to this country, even if you have jobs for them?
(2 of 4)

We need more nursing students going through our nursing schools. That's a fact. But our nursing schools can't spit out (graduates) fast enough to fill the needs. I agree with let's grow them at home. We have to do that. But I also think you can complement that (effort) with a small percentage of international nurses that meet proper standards.
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This is a 10- or 15-year issue. Recruiting international nurses can play a role along with producing more U.S. graduates. Primarily, we bring in people from the Philippines and India. The Philippines graduates about 160,000 nurses a year in a country that probably needs no more than
20 percent of that total. They are being trained, and they want to go elsewhere to earn a living. They're going to Canada, the United Kingdom, the Middle East and a lot of places. They're motivated.

What's your client base? Is it exclusively major hospital chains or do you deal with smaller medical facilities as well?

Most of the places that we have nurses are more the border states, Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona, Texas, Florida, the Carolinas — and in Tennessee we have clients because this is our home base.

It really depends on the market. You might have a large academic institution that has such big needs that they've gone to an international recruitment strategy or it might be a smaller hospital that's in a market where they can't find enough nurses.

We're now also starting to bring in physical therapists, occupational therapists and some of these other allied services. You know, it's funny. People assume there are a lot of international nurses working in this country, but the international nurse population in the U.S. is less than 4 percent. Most of them come on 30-month agreements.

Describe your earliest involvement with HCCA. Were you an investor in the company long before you took on a management role?

I got started in the staffing business in 1990 and had a company called HRA Inc., which was based in Middle Tennessee and provided temporary employees to all sorts of companies. It grew from a single branch in 1990 to about 19 branches by 1996. That's when we decided to take the company public.
(3 of 4)

I asked (entrepreneur) Clayton McWhorter to go on our board at that time because I wanted another Nashvillian there. He's a smart man and a mentor. He had just started an investment fund, Clayton and Associates, and I invested in it. That fund became one of the original investors in HCCA.
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Was your original staffing company involved in health care or did it focus mostly on other industries?

It was across the board. It did everything from a warehouse worker to a computer programmer, and it had a ton of health-care clients, but we didn't provide clinical personnel for them. We'd supply office workers.

Looking back, today, I wonder why we didn't get into health-care staffing in a bigger way, but our other businesses were growing so fast. HRA went public in 1996 and by that time we had 100 offices. By the year 2000, we had expanded to 300 offices.

When I first got in the staffing business in 1990, you had to almost sell the concept to someone. It wasn't standard practice to have a temporary associate in the office. By the late 1990s, though, almost everybody had used or wanted to use some form of contingent worker. The industry was growing and that put us in a good place. In 1996, we changed our name from HRA Inc. to Staffmark.

Our strategy was really community driven. It was all about local relationships. We stressed for our staff to get involved locally. If people know you in a community, they want to do business with you.

How did your recent switch to become president of HCCA International come about?

Last January, we made the decision to merge Staffmark with CBS/Venturi, another national staffing firm. Staffmark had become a privately owned company. CBS/Venturi was private as well. We could see the economy was about to slow down; we were about $700 million in annual revenues; CBS/Venturi was a little bit smaller. It just made sense to put the two companies together. I'm still active with the company. I'm on their board and I have an ownership stake. But I gave up the day-to-day involvement.
(4 of 4)

Did you seek out HCCA at that point or did they find you?
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A little bit of both. I had chaired the American Staffing Association in 2005-2006, and because of that I was involved with the industry as a whole and with a lot of health- care staffing companies.

When we made the Staffmark change, I didn't really want to get out of the business completely. But I also didn't want to compete with my old company. I had spent more than a decade building it. So, switching to health-care staffing made a lot of sense. Staffmark doesn't have a problem with it because they don't really compete in that area.

HCCA is an international nurse recruiting business. They wanted someone who could come up with a domestic strategy for them, something to complement their international business. We started talking a little bit, and me coming on board made a lot of sense. The fact that HCCA is in Nashville is a plus, too; most of the people I need to know are here.

What are some advantages of temporary staffing to the business owner?

From an employer's standpoint, if you're outsourcing, you know exactly what it's going to cost you. You don't have to worry about workers' compensation or other issues. If a situation arises with a contingent worker, it's not your issue — it's the staffing agency's issue.

The niche and the level of sophistication in the industry have changed a lot. Some of the best call center operators, for instance, come from a temporary firm. The other thing, too, is that workers don't stay on board forever with a company anymore.

A temporary work force makes it easier to downsize when necessary. If a company isn't making its numbers, they cut back on the work force, and that's easier to do if a portion of it is temporary (employees). You haven't invested 10 or 15 years in training that employee, and then you have to let them go. The pains of laying off aren't so great.

As the economy has slowed down over the past year, how has it affected the temporary staffing business?

When the economy slows down a little bit, our business does pretty well. Companies typically turn to a contingent work force to get the job done. But this economic downturn is worse. We went past the slowdown … to a point where it has affected everyone. But when the U.S. temporary work force starts to grow again, it will be a sign that we're starting to come out of this thing.

We need more nursing students going through our nursing schools. That's a fact. But our nursing schools can't spit out (graduates) fast enough to fill the needs. I agree with let's grow them at home. We have to do that. But I also think you can complement that (effort) with a small percentage of international nurses that meet proper standards.
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This is a 10- or 15-year issue. Recruiting international nurses can play a role along with producing more U.S. graduates. Primarily, we bring in people from the Philippines and India. The Philippines graduates about 160,000 nurses a year in a country that probably needs no more than
20 percent of that total. They are being trained, and they want to go elsewhere to earn a living. They're going to Canada, the United Kingdom, the Middle East and a lot of places. They're motivated.

What's your client base? Is it exclusively major hospital chains or do you deal with smaller medical facilities as well?

Most of the places that we have nurses are more the border states, Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona, Texas, Florida, the Carolinas — and in Tennessee we have clients because this is our home base.

It really depends on the market. You might have a large academic institution that has such big needs that they've gone to an international recruitment strategy or it might be a smaller hospital that's in a market where they can't find enough nurses.

We're now also starting to bring in physical therapists, occupational therapists and some of these other allied services. You know, it's funny. People assume there are a lot of international nurses working in this country, but the international nurse population in the U.S. is less than 4 percent. Most of them come on 30-month agreements.

Describe your earliest involvement with HCCA. Were you an investor in the company long before you took on a management role?

I got started in the staffing business in 1990 and had a company called HRA Inc., which was based in Middle Tennessee and provided temporary employees to all sorts of companies. It grew from a single branch in 1990 to about 19 branches by 1996. That's when we decided to take the company public.

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Friday, May 1, 2009

The ailing economy is helping to ease the nursing shortage.

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With house prices falling and the cost of gasoline and food rising, many nurses are going back to work, in some cases to make up for the income of a spouse who has lost a job. Hospitals say part-time nurses are taking on extra shifts. And nursing schools are seeing an increase in people applying for refresher courses on the ins and outs of modern hospitals. Some older nurses are putting off a planned retirement.

"We are seeing a temporary lessening of the nursing shortage," says Jane Llewellyn, vice president of clinical nursing affairs at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. But, she says, "as soon as the economy turns up we'll see them staying home again."

It's a familiar pattern during economic slowdowns. For years, the high demand for nurses has allowed them to design work schedules that suit their financial and family needs. Many start off working full time on difficult shifts and then reduce their hours when they have a family -- the profession is more than 90% female -- or as they approach retirement. But when the economy goes sour, many nurses go back to work full time.

Dana Goodin, a nurse at Chicago's Rush University, worked three evening shifts a week for nearly two decades, giving her time to raise her four children. But after her husband, a carpenter, was laid off late last year, Ms. Goodin began working four days a week to boost the family's income and to qualify for cheaper health benefits. Although her husband has since found a new job at a retail warehouse, he makes just half of his former salary, and Ms. Goodin is looking for another shift to push her above full time.

The nursing profession also is attracting greater interest among new recruits, drawn by expanding job opportunities and rising wages in some places. Nursing school enrollment surged in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and the economic slowdown that followed. Enrollment continues to grow apace, though at a reduced rate, and schools are turning away thousands of qualified applicants for lack of faculty. Even so, nursing experts predict shortages will grow in future years as demand for nursing services outpaces the number of professionals entering the field.

For hospitals, the renewed interest in nursing is a relief. Shawn Tyrrell, chief nursing officer at Rush-Copley Medical Center in Aurora, Ill., says that until last year the hospital used outside employment agencies when it didn't have enough nurses to cover the shifts. Now, despite an increase in patient volume, the hospital's own nurses want extra hours, so it doesn't need the agencies. "We've been able to handle that volume increase through our own staff members," she says.

The nursing shortage began in the 1990s as older nurses started retiring and there were fewer newcomers to take their place. The crunch got worse as baby boomers got older and demand for health care increased. By 2001, there were 126,000 vacant nursing positions in the U.S., according to the American Hospital Association. That means about 13% of all nursing jobs were unfilled.

o attract nurses, hospitals have increased wages and beefed up recruiting, including from overseas, and have offered potential hires signing bonuses of cash or even new cars. Hospitals have also taken steps to keep older nurses in the work force by making their jobs easier, including replacing hand cranks used to lift beds with automated lift devices, bringing in lift teams so nurses don't strain themselves picking up patients, or putting supplies closer to patients' rooms to cut down on walking. By the end of 2006, the nurse vacancy rate had fallen to 8.1%.

Of course, nurses who haven't been working for some time can't just jump back into the job. Nurse-education requirements vary from state to state, but in general the longer the nurse has been out of the work force the more likely it is he or she will have to complete a refresher course to be relicensed. The Mount Carmel College of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio, for instance, offers a refresher program for $700 plus the cost of textbooks that includes 230 hours of online courses, covering such topics as anatomy, new medications and privacy regulations. Students also log 100 hours working in a clinical setting such as a nursing home or a hospital.

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